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Aimee L. Francom (CCMHC, NCC)

Aimee has her Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Family and Human Development from Utah State University (2002). She also has a Master of Arts Degree in Mental Health Counseling and a Master of Science Degree in Administration and Supervision from Gallaudet University, in Washington, DC (2007). Aimee sustained a traumatic brain injury and numerous other severe injuries in a car accident in 2001. Aimee lost her husband in this accident, a short time after they were married, giving her personal experience with grief, trauma and loss. Aimee became a therapist because her therapist had a profound influence on her life. Aimee specializes in suicide prevention, trauma, grief, and loss. Aimee found Cognitive FX in 2017, and wishes she had known about it earlier. She is writing this series of posts to help each individual to be empowered after a TBI.

Recent Posts

A Tool to Support You in Healing 

After you have received treatment, or are feeling better, and are no longer feeling like your concussed/traumatic brain injury (TBI) self, you may find yourself still holding back or saying the words “I can’t.”

It was a traumatic injury, sometimes the recovery...

Acceptance is the ultimate goal with regard to the stages of grief, your TBI or concussion, and the new you.

Acceptance is accepting who you are, where you are, how you are. This is it. This is YOU. The good, the bad, and the ugly. And you are truly amazing. Struggles and all. You are a survivor...

Many believe the five stages of grief last weeks or months, but according to Elisabeth Kübler-Ross and David Kessler,  the stages of grief are responses to feelings that can last for minutes or hours as we flip in and out of one and then another. As a reminder, we do not enter and leave each...

Depression, one of the five stages of grief, may be the most familiar, and frustrating, feeling experienced after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion. And it’s not a fun one. Depression is a feeling of loss, emptiness, sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, and/or confusion.

Depression as...

After a traumatic brain injury or concussion, relationships can become strained. Communication can be difficult. Let’s be honest, thinking can be difficult. Sorting out your feelings and sharing them in a healthy way may feel impossible. After a TBI, the areas of your brain that affect...

Anger is a stage in the grief process. Many times when we experience loss, or trauma, we experience anger, irritability, frustration, or even frequent annoyance. Anger is a healthy emotion, one we don’t necessarily like, but it’s not wrong to feel angry. Experiencing anger doesn’t say anything...

What is Denial?

Denial is a stage in the grief process. Many times it just doesn’t feel real. We may believe we’re imagining the pain or trauma we’re currently experiencing. It’s a bad dream, a nightmare. We’re in shock and we’re anxious to wake up and go back to our normal reality.

If you have had a recent brain injury and are unsure how to deal with the symptoms and changes you are experiencing, then this post is for you! To begin with, we encourage you to find a doctor and work with them throughout your recovery. Finding the right doctor to be on your team is very...

Grief and loss are a part of life, but they are the least talked about part of life. Have you ever wondered why that is? It is because grief is HARD. Going through it is difficult. We seem to feel if we avoid talking about it, we will avoid feeling grief entirely. Wrong.

Maybe you have heard of...

Everyone’s experience is different. Anyone experiencing a concussion or TBI has a different story, different outlook on life, and different symptoms, their experience of EPIC Treatment is going to be different as well. With that said, here’s my experience. I was injured 17 years before I...

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